Catharine Place Residents Association

 

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Catharine Place

Catharine Place Residents Association (CPRA) is one of some 16 (?) such associations in the city of Bath, located in south-west England. Catharine Place itself is located in the north-central area of Bath and consists of terraced five-storey Georgian houses which flank what was originally an open square when the houses were built in the period 1776 -80 (see history). Nowadays, the square contains a garden which is divided into northern and southern halves by a central walkway. It is thought the garden was installed in the mid-nineteenth century (see history). Three of the streets abutting the square bear the name Catharine Place while the fourth street, on the northern side of the square, is Rivers Street. All residents living in houses adjacent to the square are eligible to become members of the CPRA on payment of the annual subscription.

Since the CPRA, rather than the Council Authority (i.e. Bath and North East Somerset (BANES) Authority), is responsible for maintaining the square gardens, most of the subscription income is used for this purpose. Typical items of expenditure in this regard include tree husbandry and surgery, carried out every three years, railing and plinth repair/replacement, and purchases for the garden. Because CPRA has responsibility for maintaining the square garden, membership subscriptions are higher than for most of the other residents associations in Bath. In compensation, however, Catharine Place residents can enjoy the attractiveness and charm of the garden throughout the year.

Members of the Association can obtain a key, providing them with access to the garden, against a small deposit. In addition the CPRA arranges an informal annual neighbourhood party which is held in the garden.

As well as maintaining the garden, the CPRA also takes an interest, or is involved, in a wide variety of other issues which are likely to be of relevance to residents of Catharine Place. These include, for example, issues relating to parking, street litter and street noise. The CPRA is also a member of the Federation of Bath Residents Associations which is consulted by, and gives advice to, BANES on a range of matters affecting the city. The CPRA is also a member of the Bath Preservation Society which promotes the welfare of the built environment by fostering the preservation of Bath’s Georgian heritage and monitoring the appropriateness of planned new developments. Membership of the Bath Preservation Society entitles the CPRA to two tickets which may be borrowed by members and which provide free entry to a number of Georgian buildings of interest including No.1 Royal Crescent, Beckford’s Tower and the Herschel Museum.

 The activities of the CPRA are organised through a committee. The committee should ideally have six members and is elected at the Annual General Meeting of the Association.